Authors: Romain Su

The submission calls for the recognition of the enhanced role of non-state actors in international affairs by starting eight sectoral platforms corresponding to the aspects of Agenda 2030. Drawing on existing international structures, membership in a Global Partnership would be open to all actors having real expertise in the specific area, regardless of their nature. Each platform identifies the goals its sector needs to meet. By working concurrently on several projects on the platforms, actors would develop synergies and identify best practices thanks to a large "project library" drawing from the power of big data. The Platforms and the database are to be financed by more efficient resource coordination through the platforms, voluntary contribution and by the institution of a global tax, e.g. on carbon.

Title:

1. Abstract

Based on past and present lessons and with the twofold aim of being both realistic and effective, we have decided to position our model within the following framework:

– It is not revolutionary – we do not call into question the existing international order, nor its principles (non-recourse to war, state monopoly of the “maintenance or restoration of international peace and security”,equality between states and respect for their sovereignty), nor its institutional architecture (preservation of existing international organizations, no creation of a new international interstate organization);

– The recognition of the enhanced role of non-state actors (local authorities, businesses, NGOs) in international affairs;

– A structure, approach and objectives that have already been formulated and accepted by the United Nations, namely in the shape of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which draws on global partnership and an integratedapproach where all 17 Goals form an inseparableunity.

Our model associates the four contemporary global risks – climate change, environmental damage, conflict and extreme poverty – and re-examines them using an approach that is both positive and integrated: an international sustainable development agenda. This policy does not cover disarmament, nuclear weapons, weapons of mass destruction, or war. These issues should be dealt with by the Security Council and the UN Conference on Disarmament, since no realistic alternative scenario exists to reform the mechanisms for the “maintenance or restoration of international peace and security”. However, an international sustainable development agenda helps to reduce sources of tension, or even conflicts about access to economic or natural resources and thus acts in a preventative manner.

This policy is to be conducted under the auspices of a United Nations global partnership, which would include eight sectoral platforms corresponding to all aspects of an international sustainable development agenda: construction and housing, water, sanitation, hygiene, (WASH), energy, mobility, telecommunications, health, education and sovereign functions (administration, taxation, security and justice). These platforms could draw on existing structures like the World Water Council or the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Membership of the platforms would be open to actors having real expertise in the specific area, regardless of their nature – local authorities, businesses, independent contractors, NGOs and foundations as well as national development agencies – or their location. The actors would be encouraged to join the platforms in clusters, that is, in collaboration with existing partners who may have been donors, implementing bodies or beneficiaries. The aim of the clusters is to build on the experience and relationships of trust developed during previous projects: in turn, this will enhance replication and improve performance, in terms of cost or speed of execution. The principle of openness and voluntary membership of the platforms has the specific aim of overcoming the opposition or even inability of some national governments to participate in an international sustainable development agenda.

The sectoral platforms shall make use of communication, mobilization and coordination tools; these are designed primarily for their members. However, the platforms must also communicate and mobilize externally so as to increase their effectiveness and convince even more actors to join them. The platforms must thus first define the goals that are not being met in their respective sectors, while applying the technical terms of the 17 Goals and the 169 targets of the UN 2030 Agenda.

Every project, as a basis for action, must commit to working on one or more of these goals and also demonstrate its capacity to improve the corresponding indicators, ex anteby means of an estimate and then ex postby means of an evaluation. It does not necessarily follow that the projects have to be mono-sectorial. On the contrary, where relevant, they would work on several platforms so as to avoid the pitfalls inherent in using only Sector-Wide Approaches (SWAp) and encourage research into synergies between sectors, for example, via the deployment of intelligent systems in construction or transport or amalgamating civil engineering works when implementing network infrastructures.

Global partnership and the sectoral platforms would be accompanied by an IT system that would collate – in an intelligible, dynamic and interconnected manner – completed projects, those still at the preparation stage (calls for projects and finding partners) as well as projects that are currently underway. This large database would make it easier for actors to connect and would also promote best practice at a global level.

Lastly, the model would be financed by two types of source funding. In the first instance, it would be advisable to record and co-ordinate more effectively those resources already being utilized in an international sustainable development agenda, but are not being recorded statistically. This is particularly relevant for NGO and business expenditure; also of note is investment in developed countries that contributes to the preservation of public goods, for example, by prioritizing the protection of biodiversity and the reduction of greenhouse gases.

In the second instance, we propose raising new revenue viaa global carbon pricing system and/or the creation of a tax or voluntary contribution paid by multinational companies. Since multinationals represent some of the principal beneficiaries of globalization and have a major impact on public goods (at times indeed negatively), their political role and their desire to take responsibility beyond a limited business sphere needs to be fully recognized as well as their participation in the conception and implementation of a formalized international sustainable development agenda in exchange for transparent and significant financial input in order to achieve this policy.

Sur la base des leçons du passé et du présent et dans un double souci de réalisme et d'efficacité, nous avons choisi d'inscrire notre modèle dans les contraintes suivantes :

– pas de révolution – nous ne remettons pas en cause l'ordre international existant, ni dans ses principes (non-recours à la guerre, monopole des États dans le domaine du «maintien ou de rétablissement de la paix et de la sécurité internationales », égalité entre États et respect de leur souveraineté), ni dans son architecture institutionnelle (préservation des organisations internationales existantes, pas de création de nouvelle organisation internationale interétatique) ;

– la reconnaissance du rôle accru d'acteurs non étatiques (collectivités locales, entreprises, ONG) dans les affaires internationales;

– une structure, une approche et des objectifs qui ont déjà été formulés et acceptés par les Nations Unies, à savoir un « Programme de développement durable à l'horizon 2030 » s'appuyant sur un partenariat mondial et une approche « intégrée » qui définit 17 objectifs « indissociables ».

Notre modèle associe les quatre risques globaux contemporains – changement climatique, dommages environnementaux, conflits et extrême pauvreté – et les retourne dans une approche à la fois positive et intégrée que l'on appelle la politique internationale de développement durable. Cette politique exclut les questions de désarmement, des armes nucléaires, des armes de destruction massive et des guerres dont la gestion devrait demeurer entre les mains du Conseil de sécurité et de la Conférence de désarmement de l'ONU, faute de scenarioalternatif réaliste de réforme des mécanismes de « maintien ou de rétablissement de la paix et de la sécurité internationales ». Néanmoins, la politique internationale de développement durable participe à la réduction des sources de tension, voire de conflit pour l'accès aux ressources économiques ou naturelles et agit donc de manière préventive.

Cette politique devrait être menée sous l'égide du partenariat mondial des Nations Unies qui comprendrait lui-même huit plateformes sectorielles correspondant à toutes les dimensions d'une politique internationale de développement durable : bâtiment et logement, WASH (eau, assainissement, hygiène), énergie, mobilité, télécommunications, santé, éducation et missions régaliennes (administration, fiscalité, sécurité et justice). Ces plateformes pourraient s'appuyer sur des structures déjà existantes comme le Conseil mondial de l'eau ou le Fonds mondial de lutte contre le sida, la tuberculose et le paludisme.

L'adhésion aux plateformes serait ouverte aux acteurs disposant d’une réelle expertise dans le secteur considéré, indépendamment de leur nature (collectivités locales, entreprises et consultants indépendants, ONG et fondations, agences nationales de développement…) et de leur localisation. Les acteurs seraient incités à rejoindre les plateformes en grappes, c’est-à-dire avec des partenaires avec lesquels ils ont déjà travaillé, qu’ils soient donateurs, exécutants ou bénéficiaires. Les grappes doivent valoriser l’expérience et les relations de confiance construites autour de projets précédents afin de favoriser leur réplicabilité et d’améliorer leurs performances, que ce soit en termes de coûts ou de vitesse d’exécution. Les principes d'ouverture et d'accession volontaire caractérisant les plateformes doivent notamment permettre de contourner le refus ou l'incapacité de certains gouvernements nationaux à participer à la politique internationale de développement durable.

Les plateformes sectorielles doivent servir d'outils de communication, de mobilisation et de coordination en premier lieu pour leurs membres, mais elles doivent aussi communiquer et mobiliser à l'extérieur afin d'afficher leur efficacité et de convaincre toujours plus d'acteurs de les rejoindre. C'est pourquoi elles devront tout d'abord définir des buts qui déclinent dans leurs secteurs respectifs et en termes techniques les 17 objectifs et les 169 cibles de l'Agenda 2030 des Nations Unies.

Tout projet, en tant base d'action, devra s'inscrire sous un ou plusieurs de ces buts et démontrer sa capacité à faire progresser les indicateurs correspondants, ex antesous forme d'estimation puis ex post sous forme d'évaluation. Il n'en résulte pas pour autant que les projets doivent être mono-sectoriels. Au contraire, lorsque c'est pertinent, ils s'appuieraient sur plusieurs plateformes pour éviter les écueils des approches purement « SWAp » (Sector-Wide Approach) et encourager la recherche de synergies entre secteurs, par exemple via le déploiement de systèmes intelligents dans le bâtiment ou le transport ou la mutualisation des travaux de génie civil pour la mise en place d’infrastructures de réseau.

Le partenariat mondial et les plateformes sectorielles seraient accompagnés d'un système informatique qui rassemblerait de manière intelligible, dynamique et interconnectée les projets déjà réalisés, ceux en cours de préparation – appels à projets et recherche de partenaires – et ceux en cours de réalisation. Cette grande base de données faciliterait la mise en relation d'acteurs et la promotion des meilleures pratiques à l'échelle globale.

Enfin, le financement du modèle serait assuré par deux types de source. Premièrement, il convient de mieux comptabiliser et coordonner les moyens déjà engagés de fait dans la politique internationale de développement durable, mais qui échappent à la statistique. Il s'agit notamment des dépenses des ONG et des entreprises, auxquelles on pourrait ajouter les investissements réalisés dans les pays développés et contribuant à la préservation des biens communs, par exemple en faveur de la protection de la biodiversité et de la diminution des gaz à effet de serre.

Deuxièmement, il est suggéré de lever de nouvelles recettes via un système de tarification globale du carbone et/ou la création d'un impôt ou d'une contribution volontaire acquittée par les multinationales. Puisqu'elles comptent parmi les principaux bénéficiaires de la mondialisation et qu'elles ont un impact fort sur les biens communs, parfois d'ailleurs négatif, leur rôle politique et leur désir de prise de responsabilité au-delà de la stricte sphère marchande devraient être pleinement reconnus et leur participation à la conception et à la mise en œuvre de la politique internationale de développement durable officialisée en échange d'un apport financier transparent et significatif pour la réalisation de cette politique.

2. Description of the model

0. Past and Present Lessons

About one hundred years ago a historic work was published, The Great Illusion by the English journalist Norman Angell. Although the great European powers were embroiled in an arms race, the author of the book [1] was of the opinion that there had been trade and financial interdependence between these powers since the second half of the 19th century (the “first globalization” according to Suzanne Berger [2]) and that this made war unlikely as it was not economically profitable.

Fully aware that armed conflicts could be motivated by factors other than that of attaining material advantage, Norman Angell (who was speaking, above all, to his fellow citizens) encouraged them to again be an example to the rest of Europe and the world by publicly renouncing aggression as a foreign policy tool and instead maintaining only a defensive army.

When the First World War broke out in 1914, which a posterioriproved to be the beginning of a second Thirty Years’ War in Europe, many readers of Norman Angell disregarded his theories as naive and unrealistic. Indeed, even today, the example of the Great War remains the most convincing demonstration that the existence of a collective interest or of a public good– here, economic prosperity –even if it is recognized by large numbers of the population, is not enough in itself to influence decisions that promote preservation. This is an important lesson that we need to remember when we confront contemporary global risks like climate change, environmental damage, conflict and extreme poverty.

However, the accusation of idealism against Norman Angell was unfair for several reasons. First of all, his hypothesis on the economically non-profitable character of war in a globalized world was correct: the two world wars left Europe in ruins and allowed the United States to take over as the greatest economic power on the planet.

Furthermore, it is not insignificant that, after 1945, most of the ministries of war throughout the world were gradually renamed ministries of defence.Despite repeated violations, the rule of non-recourse to war, formulated in the Kellogg-Briand Pact of 1928 and renewed and extended in the Charter of United Nations in 1945,is, at least in principle, accepted by almost every state on the planet. This universal recognition, although often in name only, nevertheless constitutes significant progress.

In the same way that the Treaty of Westphalia, signed in 1648 at the end of the Thirty Years’ War, laid the foundation for an order that lasted until the French Revolution at the end of the 18th century, the Bretton Woods Agreement of 1944 and the Charter of the United Nations, adopted one year later, led to the institutions and constitutional principles of the postwar international order. Their underlying principles are still valid today. It could also be noted here that these great political constructs were born of major conflicts. Without going as far as to suggest that this could be a historical necessity, it is useful to recall this argument for those who have been quick to criticize the United Nations system and wish to do away with it all together in order to reconstruct a completely new international order that is more effective and fairer.

The similarities between the Westphalian order and that of the UN are not limited to their origin. It is tempting to say that the UN order is a global extension – its role specifically shaped by the decolonization movement and the end of the Cold War – of the principles established by the Westphalian order and was originally formulated with the aim of establishing lasting peace in Europe. Both systems acknowledge that states have an exclusive monopoly on the administration of international relations and the representation of the peoples of the world, on whose behalf the Charter of the United Nations was drawn up. Even the UN Economic and Social Council brings together states, in contrast to other bodies bearing the same name at European or national level that include representatives of businesses, unions and other associations and non-governmental organizations (NGO).

The second essential characteristic of the Westphalian and UN orders is the sovereign equality of states[3]. This principle, which has increasingly lost its relevance as it has progressively been extended demographically, economically and even militarily to non-egalitarian states, nevertheless ensures to us all the protection under law of independent status and formal equality with regard to decision making. In practice, in the case of the United Nations, the privileges of the permanent members of the Security Council and the weakness of some states, which reduces their function to that of a “client” of the great powers, demonstrates the limits of this declared equality.

The ongoing integration of trade and finance from the 17th to the 20th century, enabled specifically by technological progress, made it necessary to add an economic component to the international order. This culminated in the Bretton Woods Agreement and the creation of three institutions or systems in the 1940s: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (predecessor of the World Bank), the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), the original form of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

The interwar experience had indeed demonstrated that a lack of coordination of exchange-rate policies and trade tariffs at international level could exacerbate the impact of an economic crisis and impede recovery. Furthermore, economists like John Maynard Keynes from the UK [4] elaborated on the ideas of earlier thinkers like Montesquieu who stated in the 18th century that “the natural consequence of trade is to bring peace” [5]. This is why, although the “maintenance of international peace and security” remains the main goal of an international order, it has become commonplace to consider economic policies like the coordination of exchange-rate policies and trade tariffs, or even the fight against poverty, as contributing to the achievement of this objective and thus justifying their inclusion in international institutions.

It should be noted at this point that two of the four identified global risks – conflict and extreme poverty – are already covered by dedicated institutions – the UN and the World Bank respectively – while the two other risks – climate change and environmental damage – receive very little coverage. The awareness that natural resources were being exhausted and that pollution was a result of the modus operandi of the industrial economy only began to reach public consciousness from the 1960s on, thanks to publications like Silent Springby Rachel Carson and the Club of Rome’s report.

Even if the UN has addressed this issue in a series of initiatives (conferences and earth summits, the United Nations Environment Programme, climate and biodiversity conventions), some researchers, intellectuals and activists regard these efforts as insufficient and thus believe it is necessary to create a new specialized body. According to these critics, only a world environmental organization would have the power to give the protection of the environment the same importance as the liberalization of international trade and investment or the fight against poverty, led by the trio of the WTO, the IMF and the World Bank.

However three objections can be raised with regard to this proposition. The first questions the feasibility of such an organization, even in the medium term. Is it realistic to expect 193 states to comply with a new organization, given the difficulties that have been experienced over the last twenty years in negotiating with the international community in global or semi-global processes like trade or climate negotiations?

Secondly, even if we hypothesize that an agreement would be unanimous or almost unanimous (as was the case in 2015 with regard to the Paris Agreement) do states have the effective capacity to act on global warming, while a great number of the instruments for action are actually within the remit of local authorities and private businesses?

Finally, should the protection of the environment continue to be the subject of a separate public policy or, in order to increase its impact, should it not be integrated into trade and investment policy or even into development aid? The existence of a dedicated institution is not a sufficient condition for the prioritization of an issue, as is demonstrated by the example of the International Labor Organization (ILO), whose activities are essentially limited to collecting statistics and the “gentle” promotion of norms and best practices. On the other hand, it is notable that this is one of the few specialized UN agencies to have non-state actors (representatives of employers and workers) as members of its Governing Body.

The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement between the EU and Canada (CETA) takes a different approach. Although it focuses on trade and investment, it contains many provisions regarding the protection of the environment and social legislation that are upheld by dispute settlement procedures. This model could inspire work towards global governance.

What guidelines can be drawn from this brief overview of the foundations of the current global order that could help to find a solution that is both effective and feasible and has the aim of improving the capacity of international cooperation for dealing with the interlinked dangers of climate change, large-scale environmental damage, violent conflict and extreme poverty?

– Unless a new world war or a catastrophe of unimaginable scope occur (which of course is not to be recommended), it is very unlikely that the current international order will be replaced by a completely new system. However we would like to propose a reformist, evolutionary and incremental method that respects existing institutions and principles and is not a revolution.

– At the same time, it is indisputable that the distribution of power is more fragmented today than in the 1940s, both with regard to states themselves and between states and other actors like local and regional authorities, businesses or even some NGOs. In order for these actors to participate in the implementation phase, it is essential that they have a role beyond that of mere consultation in the decision-making process.

– When accepting the rule of the sovereign equality of states, the hypothesis must be accepted that not everyone will comply with the proposed system of international cooperation from the very start. Finding a compromise between its universality and its binding character, which is a guarantee of its effectiveness, must not remove the “teeth” from this system. Experimenting first with a limited number of states in a robust system is perhaps preferable to dooming the system to political impotence in the name of universalism.

– Following the logic that has led certain economic policies to be coordinated at international level so that they contribute to achieving the main goal of an international order of maintaining international peace and security, the four contemporary global risks – climate change, environmental damage, conflict and extreme poverty – must be dealt with in an integrated manner. The first two risks do not come under the remit of dedicated institutions and thus entail a significant security dimension. In order to clarify our proposal, we will continue with this integrated approach in the following section.

1. An Integrated Approach

During the summer of 2015, several months before the COP21 climate conference, which concluded with the approval of the Paris Agreement, the United Nations came to a consensus about the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, comprising 17 Goals, including the eradication of poverty, the fight against climate change, the protection of the environment and the promotion of peaceful societies [6]. This is a “positive” agenda that responds to the four global risks mentioned above and, although it is not legally binding for states or for other international organizations within the UN system, it has the merit of drawing on the greatest possible political legitimacy.

Furthermore, the Agenda acknowledges the integrated and inseparable character of the objectives and targets of sustainable development as well as the necessity of complying with a Global Partnership to achieve them. This approach, put forward by many researchers, public development aid agencies and NGOs, is also the framework within which we present our endeavour. This is why, rather than discussing the four global risks, we prefer the term “international sustainable development agenda”, based on a positive and integrated approach.

This choice, however, excludes the issues of nuclear weapons, weapons of mass destruction and war from the scope of our proposal. We are of the opinion that unless there is an explosion or a major global catastrophe, the current system of “maintenance or restoration of international peace and security”, based on the Security Council, will not be reformed, replaced or bypassed in the medium term. It should be noted that, despite its many flaws, the Security Council has succeeded, over the course of seventy years, in preventing the outbreak of a third world war.

Neither do we see an alternative to the UN Conference on Disarmament nor to the instruments it has helped to create, like the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. Even if the results of the work of this Conference are mixed, to say the least, it is very unlikely that states – the main decision makers on this subject – would unanimously agree to give up all their military equipment over the medium term, which is the prerequisite for guaranteed and complete disarmament globally. Equally, our approach considers security issues since an international sustainable development agenda helps to limit sources of tension, or even conflict, regarding the accessing of economic or natural resources and thus has a preventative affect.

2. A Global Partnership and Eight Sectoral Platforms

The second characteristic of our proposal draws on the global partnership that is mentioned in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

This concept does not foresee the creation of new international institutions, such as a specialized organization like a global environmental organization or a global super-government that would oversee or even be a substitute for the UN and the trio of the WTO/IMF/World Bank.

This choice is justified by two reasons. Firstly, in the absence of a hegemoncapable of imposing this new order on the planet and/or an unprecedented catastrophe that would annul the legitimacy of the current system from the viewpoint of states and their peoples, it is extremely unlikely that these same states would agree to hand over their powers to specialized or general international organizations. The politics of the current US president Donald Trump – clearly opposed to multilateralism – demonstrate how Washington has abandoned its role of principal guarantor and promoter of an open international order that is shaped by stronger and more sustainable links that those created by short-lived bilateral deals.

The second reason is more profound. From our point of view, the current model of international organization, which depends on cooperation between member states, has fallen into disuse. In all other circumstances, for example, running military operations or conducting scientific research programmes, the project model proposes that “the mission should determine the coalition, and not the other way around” as noted by the US Secretary for Defence Donald Rumsfeld in 2001. In other words, we have moved into an era of ad hoc partnerships that do not aim to be permanent and that bring together relevant voluntary actors to achieve a specific objective during the time available.

This evolution has been made possible, at least in part, by technological progress in the fields of transport and communication, enabling contacts between geographical locations that are great distances apart and allowing virtual coordination of the actions of a large number of partners. This evolution is essential because of the growing fragmentation of power and knowledge distribution between a greater number and diversity of actors – states, local authorities, businesses, NGOs – as well as individuals who produce information, raise funds and develop innovations (Linux, SpaceShipOne, HeroX) via participatory crowdfundingplatforms.

It is noteworthy that space exploration, long the privilege of a selected club of states due to the exorbitant costs and its non-profitability, is now available to private businesses, even to groups of students. Similarly, in the field of aid and development, the private foundation of Bill and Melinda Gates, with more than 1,000 collaborators and USD 4 billion in grants spent every year, has an impact that is unquestionably more significant for the population of our planet than that of many state agencies, even states themselves.

In terms of international policy, the partnership model that we favour is not completely new. Although the global partnership presented in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is not yet operational, the following organizations already exist: Global Partnership for Education (GPE), the Vaccine Alliance (GAVI) or the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Pascal Lamy, former Director-General of the WTO, wrote in this last dossier, “the World Health Organization, to be frank, has never been effective, proven by the fact that it was necessary to create the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, which works well. The WHO is based on a type of Westphalian governance in the Security Council version, while the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a type of ‘multi-level governance’ [7]”.

What these initiatives have in common is that they have concrete goals and are open to non-state actors. Initiated at the beginning of the 21st century, they can justly pride themselves on having attained excellent results. Thus, we would like to propose the application of this model in fields not yet covered by such programmes and the establishment, under the auspices of a United Nations global partnership, of eight sectoral platforms that correspond to all the aspects of an international sustainable development agenda: construction and housing, water, sanitation, hygiene, (WASH), energy, mobility, telecommunications, health, education and sovereign functions, (administration, taxation, security and justice). They could, of course, build upon existing structures.

Each of these platforms would be open to actors with solid expertise in the specific area,regardless of their nature – local authorities, businesses, independent contractors, NGOs and foundations as well as national development agencies – or their location. The actors would be encouraged to join the platforms in clusters,that is, in collaboration with existing partners who could be donors, implementing bodies or beneficiaries. The aim of the clusters is to build on the experience and relationships of trust developed during previous projects: in turn, this will enhance replication and improve performance, in terms of cost or speed of execution.

The open nature of the platforms facilitates the acceptance of contributions from actors wishing to participate in an international sustainable development agenda, even when facing opposition from their host state. It is not surprising that the United States come to mind here; as a state it withdrew from the Paris Agreement, yet there are more than 200 cities, nine federal states and a thousand businesses, representing in total one-third of the population and GDP of the US, that continue to adhere to the Paris Agreement [9].

3. Clear Objectives and Reliable Monitoring Indicators

The sectoral platforms shall make use of communication, mobilization and coordination tools; these are designed primarily for their members. However, the platforms must also communicate and mobilize externally so as to increase their effectiveness and convince even more actors to join them. The platforms must thus first define the goals that are not being met in their respective sectors, while applying the technical terms of the 17 Goals and the 169 Targets of the UN 2030 Agenda.

Every project, as a basis for action, must commit to working on one or several of these goals and demonstrate its capacity to improve the corresponding indicators, ex anteby means of an estimateand then ex post by means of an evaluation. In the era of the Internet, crowdsourcing and big data, it is high time that we recognize, also in the field of statistics, that states no longer enjoy an almost complete monopoly when it comes to collecting data and to stop using the linear process of action-measurement-report-compilation and instead utilize an automated system that enables a great number of participants to provide information and obtain feedback in well-nigh real time. An example of this revolution is the speed and high level of precision of forecasts from Google Flu Trends, which predicted when influenza epidemics would break out long before the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) [10].

Widespread access to the Internet, electronic devices (computers, mobile telephones, tablets), user-friendly applications, as well as the nascent Internet of Things, strengthen our capacity to identify very quickly and precisely the nature and location of problems such as criminality or state violence, sources of pollution or traffic congestion. These can then be classified in order of priority so as to direct available intervention resources where they will have the greatest impact.

The integration of an array of public policy monitoring indicators and project management tools must also facilitate benchmarking on a global scale in order to identify the most effective solutions and to speed up their reproducibility, where both possible and relevant, adapting and/or improving them where necessary.

The attempt to bring the, often isolated, actions of national governments and their agencies, local authorities, NGOs and even businesses (to name only a few) into a common framework is ultimately only an extension of the concept of Policy Coherence for Development (PCD), examined in great depth by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), but which has, to date, largely focused on coherence between public policies (agriculture, trade, etc.). The platforms will go further by aiming to ensure the complementarity of actions between different levels and types of actors and thus acknowledging a role for non-state bodies in both defining and implementing an international sustainable development agenda.

4. The Project Model

If the model of voluntary and open sectoral partnerships and not that of interstate cooperation in international organizations is the basis of our concept of links between the actors of an international sustainable development agenda, it follows that the project is the operational building block of this model.Whether it is the construction of a school, of a training programme for judges or the replacement of a fleet of buses to reduce the greenhouse effect, these projects all contribute to achieving an international sustainable development agenda and to reducing global risks. They should therefore be accounted for as such.

As noted above, this means that these projects must be connected to a number of sectoral indicators, and, indirectly, to the targets and objectives of the 2030 Agenda. This does not mean, however, that the projects should be mono-sectoral. On the contrary, where relevant, they would work on several platforms so as to avoid the pitfalls inherent in using only Sector-Wide Approaches (SWAp) and encourage research into synergies between sectors, for example, via the deployment of intelligent systems in construction or transport or amalgamating civil engineering works when implementing network infrastructures.

We also view the project model as the vehicle best adapted for implementing the integrated approach mentioned above as well as facilitating cooperation, working towards one or several joint objectives with diverse actors (governments, public agencies, local authorities, private businesses, NGOs, etc.) that are at times geographically very far apart.

The innovation that we introduce here is that global partnership and the sectoral platforms would be accompanied by an IT system that would collate – in an intelligible, dynamic and interconnected manner –completed projects, those still at the preparation stage (calls for projects and finding partners) as well as project that are currently underway. This large database would make it easier for actors to connect and would also promote best practice at a global scale.

5. Financing

The final element of our model is the issue of financing, which, in our opinion, also reflects the integrated approach and the evolutionary method that has been proposed so far. The difficulty of allocating an annual budget of USD 100 billion to the Green Climate Fund – a target fixed in 2009, yet representing less than 0.002% of global GNP of the period – shows that the traditional instrument for collecting voluntary state contributions cannot deal with the challenges of the 21st century.

Similarly, the well-known objective of 0.7% of gross national income committed by the member countries of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) of the OECD to support official development assistance (ODA) is losing its relevance even before it has been achieved. “This does not mean that international solidarity has decreased: on the contrary, the funds invested in what is called ‘international public policy’ increase each year”. [11] This trend, however, is no longer thanks to state support, but instead comes from NGOs and businesses within the framework of Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility (CSER), expenditures that are not counted as official development assistance.

The model of official development assistance also reflects a division between donors and beneficiaries that no longer corresponds to the reality of the 21st century. The increase in power of emerging countries, both large (China) and medium-sized (South Korea, Turkey), has led to some states being both beneficiary anddonor. Furthermore, as was noted by a French diplomat, “all countries need to deal with sustainable development” given the scale of global risks.

The first source of financing of an ambitious international sustainable development agenda must thus come from more precise reporting and from better coordination of the funds already being utilized by this policy but which are not being recorded in the statistics. This is particularly relevant for NGO and business expenditure; also of note is investment in developed countries that contributes to the preservation of public goods, for example, by prioritizing the protection of biodiversity and the reduction of greenhouse gases. This will be one of the functions of the IT system mentioned in the preceding section.

There is also the option of looking for ways of raising supplementary funds. Here, we propose two instruments that could generate significant revenues and whose implementation is feasible both at a technological and political level.

A global carbon tax is an obvious first choice. Such a mechanism would make it possible not only to raise large sums of money, but would also encourage businesses and consumers to adopt products, services and processes that emit fewer greenhouse gases and thus help to reduce the magnitude of climate change.

Its application also reflects the principles of our model. First of all, a carbon tax is not the preserve of states: some businesses already integrate an internal carbon price in their calculations to promote the use of solutions that save energy and natural resources.

Furthermore, this is an integrated mechanism, since the revenues generated can be reinvested in projects with multiple objectives, combining, for example, the protection of the environment with the fight against poverty. This sharing of benefits could convince a large number of relatively less industrialized states to espouse an international sustainable development agenda [12].

Finally, it is not necessary for all the states of our planet to decide unanimously on a global tax for this to attain a critical mass: it is possible, while adhering to current international trade regulations, to enter the carbon market “club” that already exists in about forty countries. The other countries would be encouraged to join because of border adjustment measures [13].

The second potential instrument recalls the increasing role of businesses in our societies and their aim, often unachieved, of holding responsibility at the level of their global impact. In the case of multinationals, there can be no doubt that these are some of the main beneficiaries of globalization. The commercial and financial integration of the planet is not only a condition of their very existence, but also provides a favourable environment for their growth – the fragmentation of value chains (thanks to the removal of barriers to trade), economies of scale, the search for natural resources, talent and other comparative advantages throughout the world – while also sometimes increasing the risk of social, fiscal and environmental dumping.

If globalization is to survive a global danger like the populist movements in a number of countries that are calling globalization into question, we suggest that multinationals pay a tax or voluntary contribution that would finance the functioning of a United Nations global partnership and the eight sectoral platforms mentioned above as well as the implementation of projects developed within these platforms.

In exchange, this would help to legitimize the participation of these businesses in the design and implementation of an international sustainable development agenda, since today their role in this field lacks transparency and coordination. Businesses are already associated with initiatives like the Global Partnership for Education. However, as we noted in the introduction, with the exception of the ILO, they are not formally represented in international organizations or have, at best, a limited consulting role, for example, during the COP climate conferences.

They do however play a very significant role behind the scenes: via lobbying, they have, for example, considerable influence on global decision-making processes with regard to trade issues. Rather than trying to prevent this from happening (an endeavour that has had limited success), we believe it is more effective if we recognize the political role of business in globalization, while also making it accept its responsibilities, including its financial ones.

Three IT companies alone – Apple, Google and Microsoft – have more than USD 450 billion of liquid assets! Given the current low rates of interest, this money could be utilized to meet enormous global challenges instead of being invested in Treasury bills for low return. The leaders of this kind of business are often young, ambitious and visionary and do not back away from participating in politics; they view their mission as going beyond the narrow limits of their company. Mark Zuckerberg has even been considered as a potential candidate for US president. However, given the magnitude of Facebook (more than 2 billion active users and USD 35 billion in Treasuries), it makes sense to ask if it is the White House or Menlo Park that has the greatest impact on the affairs of the world. Let us ask these companies to participate where they can be most useful.

0. Quelques leçons du passé et du présent

Il y a un peu plus de cent ans paraissait un essai qui fit date dans l'Histoire, La Grande Illusion du journaliste anglais Norman Angell. En dépit de la course aux armements à laquelle se livraient alors les grandes puissances européennes, l'auteur du livre [1] jugeait que l'interdépendance commerciale et financière construite entre elles à partir de la seconde moitié du XIXe siècle – cette « première mondialisation » dont parle Suzanne Berger [2] – avait rendu la guerre improbable car économiquement non profitable.

Sans ignorer que les conflits armés pouvaient être motivés par des facteurs autres que la recherche d'avantages matériels, Norman Angell, qui s'adressait avant tout à ses compatriotes, les incitait à montrer de nouveau l'exemple au reste de l'Europe et du monde en renonçant publiquement à l'agression comme outil de politique étrangère pour ne conserver qu'une armée défensive.

L'éclatement en 1914 de la Première Guerre mondiale, qui se révèlera a posterioriêtre également le début d'une « deuxième guerre de Trente Ans » en Europe, disqualifia auprès de nombreux lecteurs les thèses de Norman Angell, jugées naïves et irréalistes. L'exemple de la Grande Guerre demeure en effet jusqu'à ce jour la démonstration sans doute la plus convaincante que l'existence d'un intérêt collectif ou d'un bien commun – en l'espèce, la prospérité économique –, même reconnue par de larges parties de la population, ne suffit pas à elle seule à orienter la décision vers sa préservation. C'est une leçon importante dont il faut se souvenir pour faire face aux risques globaux contemporains que sont le changement climatique, les dommages environnementaux, les conflits et l’extrême pauvreté.

Le procès en idéalisme intenté à Norman Angell était cependant injuste à plusieurs titres. Tout d'abord, son hypothèse sur le caractère économiquement non profitable de la guerre dans un monde globalisé était correcte : les deux Guerres mondiales laissèrent l'Europe exsangue et permirent aux États-Unis de la détrôner du premier rang des puissances économiques de la planète.

Par ailleurs, il n'est pas anodin qu'à partir de 1945, la plupart des ministères de la Guerre dans le monde furent peu à peu rebaptisés ministères de la Défense. Malgré d'incessantes violations, la règle du non-recours à la guerre, formulée dans le pacte Briand-Kellogg de 1928 et reprise sous une forme plus large dans la Charte des Nations Unies de 1945, est au moins dans son principe acceptée par la quasi-totalité des États de la planète. Cette reconnaisance universelle, bien qu'elle ne soit souvent que déclarative, constitue néanmoins un progrès notable.

De la même façon que les traités de Westphalie, signés en 1648 à la fin de la guerre de Trente Ans, jetèrent en Europe les bases d'un ordre qui durerait jusqu'à la Révolution française à la fin du XVIIIe siècle, les Accords de Bretton Woods de 1944 et la Charte des Nations Unies adoptée un an plus tard furent à l'origine d'un ensemble d'institutions et de principes constitutifs de l'ordre international d'après-guerre. Dans leurs grandes lignes, ils sont toujours d'actualité. On remarquera entre parenthèses que ces vastes constructions politiques sont nées à la suite de conflits majeurs. Sans aller jusqu'à en tirer une nécessité historique, il n'est pas inutile de rappeler cet argument à ceux qui ont la critique facile du système des Nations Unies et appellent à faire table rase pour rebâtir un tout nouvel ordre international plus efficace et plus juste.

Les points communs entre ordre westphalien et ordre onusien ne se limitent pas à leur genèse. On serait même tenté d'affirmer que l'ordre onusien est une extension au monde entier – en particulier à l'issue du mouvement de décolonisation et après la fin de la Guerre froide – des principes posés par l'ordre westphalien et élaborés au départ dans le but d'établir une paix durable en Europe. Les deux systèmes reconnaissent aux États un monopole exclusif sur la gestion des relations internationales et sur la représentation des peuplesau nom pourtant desquels, dans le cas des Nations Unies, la Charte est rédigée. Même le Conseil économique et social de l'ONU rassemble des États, à la différence d'organes portant le même nom au niveau européen ou national mais dans lesquels siègent représentants d'entreprises, de syndicats ou d'autres associations et organisations non gouvernementales (ONG).

La seconde caractéristique essentielle des ordres westphalien et onusien est «l'égalité souveraine» des États [3]. Ce principe, devenu de plus en plus fictif au fur et à mesure qu'il était étendu à des États inégaux en termes démographiques, économiques ou encore militaires, assure néanmoins à chacun d'entre eux la protection en droit d'une existence autonome et l'égalité formelle dans la prise de décision. En pratique, dans le cas des Nations Unies, les privilèges des membres permanents du Conseil de sécurité et la faiblesse de certains États qui les réduit à la fonction de « client » des grandes puissances montrent les limites de cette égalité proclamée.

L'avancée de l'intégration commerciale et financière entre le XVIIe et le XXesiècle, permise notamment par le progrès technique, a rendu nécessaire d'ajouter à l'ordre international un volet économique qui s'est traduit par la conclusion des accords de Bretton Woods et la création dans les années 1940 de trois institutions ou systèmes : la Banque internationale pour la reconstruction et le développement (future Banque mondiale), le Fonds monétaire international (FMI) et les accords du GATT, embryon de l'Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC).

L'expérience de l'entre-deux-guerres avait en effet démontré qu'un manque de coordination au niveau international des politiques de change et des tarifs douaniers pouvait aggraver les conséquences d'une crise économique ou en ralentir la sortie. En outre, des économistes comme le Britannique John Maynard Keynes [4] approfondirent l'intuition de penseurs plus anciens comme Montesquieu qui affirmait dès le XVIIIe siècle que « l'effet naturel du commerce est de porter la paix » [5]. C'est pourquoi, bien que « le maintien de la paix et de la sécurité internationales » restent le but premier d'un ordre international, il est devenu admis que des politiques économiques comme la coordination des politiques de change et des tarifs douaniers ou bien la lutte contre la pauvreté contribuent à la réalisation de cet objectif et légitiment donc qu'elles soient encadrées par des institutions internationales.

On observera à ce stade que deux des quatre risques globaux identifiés – les conflits et l’extrême pauvreté – sont déjà couverts par des institutions dédiées – respectivement l'ONU et la Banque mondiale – tandis que les deux autres – le changement climatique et les dommages environnementaux – le sont de manière très incomplète. La prise de conscience de l'épuisement des ressources naturelles et de la pollution résultant du mode de fonctionnement de l'économie industrielle n'a commencé à se généraliser qu'à partir des années 1960 avec des travaux comme le Printemps silencieux de Rachel Carson et le rapport du Club de Rome.

Si l'ONU s'est saisie du sujet au travers d'une série d'initiatives (conférences et Sommets de la Terre, programme PNUE, conventions thématiques sur le climat ou la biodiversité), certains chercheurs, intellectuels et activistes estiment que ces efforts sont insuffisants et qu'il est désormais nécessaire de créer un nouvel organe spécialisé. Selon eux, seule une Organisation mondiale de l'environnement (OME) aurait le pouvoir de faire de la protection de l'environnement une priorité de rang égal à la libéralisation du commerce international et des investissements ou à la lutte contre la pauvreté menées par le trio OMC-FMI-Banque mondiale.

On peut toutefois émettre trois objections à cette proposition. La première questionne sa faisabilité, y compris à moyen terme : est-il réaliste de faire adhérer 193 États à une nouvelle organisation, compte tenu des difficultés constatées depuis vingt ans à impliquer l'ensemble de la communauté internationale dans des processus globaux ou quasi globaux comme les négociations commerciales ou climatiques ?

Deuxièmement, même dans l'hypothèse d'un accord unanime ou presque, comme cela a été le cas en 2015 autour de l'Accord de Paris, les États ont-ils la capacité effective d'agir sur le réchauffement climatique alors qu'une grande partie des leviers d'action se trouve en pratique entre les mains de collectivités locales et d'entreprises privées ?

Enfin, la protection de l'environnement devrait-elle continuer à faire l'objet d'une politique publique distincte ou ne devrait-elle pas, pour accroître son impact, être intégrée aux politiques commerciales, d'investissement ou encore d'aide au développement ? L'existence d'une institution dédiée ne constitue pas une condition suffisante à la consécration d'une priorité, comme le montre l'exemple de l'Organisation internationale du travail (OIT) dont les activités se limitent pour l'essentiel à la collecte de statistiques et à la promotion « molle » de normes et de bonnes pratiques. Il est en revanche notable que ce soit l'une des rares agences spécialisées de l'ONU à faire une place dans son Conseil d'administration à des acteurs non étatiques (représentants des employeurs et des travailleurs).

On trouve une approche différente dans l'accord CETA entre l’UE et le Canada. Bien que concentré sur le commerce et les investissements, il contient de nombreuses dispositions en matière de protection de l'environnement et de législation sociale sanctionnées par des mécanismes de règlement des différends. C'est un modèle qui devrait inspirer les travaux sur la gouvernance mondiale.

Quels lignes directrices pouvons-nous tirer de ce rapide tour d'horizon des fondements de l'ordre mondial actuel pour proposer une solution à la fois efficace et réalisable en vue d'améliorer la capacité de la coopération internationale à faire face aux menaces interconnectées du changement climatique, des dommages environnementaux à grande échelle, des conflits violents et de l'extrême pauvreté ?

– À moins d'une nouvelle guerre mondiale ou d'une catastrophe de grande ampleur qu'on ne saurait souhaiter, il est très improbable que l'ordre international actuel cède la place à un système entièrement nouveau. On s'attachera donc à proposer une méthode réformiste, évolutionniste, incrémentale et respectueuse des institutions et principes existants plutôt qu'une révolution.

– Dans le même temps, il est indéniable que la distribution du pouvoir est plus fragmentée aujourd'hui qu'elle ne l'était dans les années 1940, que ce soit entre les États eux-mêmes ou entre les États et d'autres acteurs comme les collectivités territoriales, les entreprises ou bien certaines ONG. Pour que ces acteurs prennent leur part dans la phase de mise en œuvre, il est indispensable de leur accorder dans le processus de prise de décision un rôle allant au-delà de simples consultations.

– Compte tenu de la règle de l'égalité souveraine des États, il faut accepter l'hypothèse que tous n'adhèrent pas dès le début au mécanisme de coopération internationale proposé. La recherche du compromis entre universalité et caractère contraignant, qui est gage d'efficacité, ne doit pas aboutir à retirer au mécanisme toutes ses «dents» et il peut être préférable d'expérimenter un système robuste avec un groupe limité d'États que de se condamner à l'impuissance au nom de l'universalisme.

– Suivant la logique qui a conduit certaines politiques économiques à être coordonnées au niveau international en ce qu'elles contribuent à la poursuite du but premier d'un ordre international de « maintien de la paix et de la sécurité internationales », les quatre risques globaux contemporains – le changement climatique, les dommages environnementaux, les conflits et l’extrême pauvreté – devraient être traités de façon intégrée. En effet, les deux premiers, quoiqu'encore non couverts par des institutions dédiées, comportent aussi une importante dimension sécuritaire. C'est avec cette approche intégrée que nous allons ouvrir la section suivante explicitant notre proposition.

1. Une approche intégrée

Pendant l'été 2015, quelques mois avant la conférence climatique COP 21 qui s'est conclue par l'approbation de l'Accord de Paris, les Nations Unies sont parvenues à un consensus sur l'adoption d'un « Programme de développement durable à l'horizon 2030 » comprenant 17 objectifs, dont l'élimination de la pauvreté, la lutte contre les changements climatiques, la protection de l'environnement et la promotion de l'avènement de sociétés pacifiques [6]. Il s'agit d'un agenda « positif » qui répond aux quatre risques globaux cités plus haut et bien qu'il ne soit juridiquement contraignant ni pour les États, ni pour les autres organisations internationales du système des Nations Unies, il présente le mérite de reposer sur la légitimité politique la plus large.

Le programme reconnaît en outre le caractère « intégré » et « indissociable » des objectifs et des cibles du développement durable ainsi que la nécessité de s'appuyer sur un « Partenariat mondial » pour les atteindre. Cette approche, défendue par de nombreux chercheurs, agences publiques d'aide au développement et ONG, est aussi celle que nous retiendrons dans le cadre du présent essai. C'est pourquoi, plutôt que parler des quatre risques globaux, nous utiliserons plus loin le terme de «politique internationale de développement durable», porteuse d'une approche à la fois positive et intégrée.

Ce choix exclut toutefois du périmètre de notre proposition les questions des armes nucléaires, des armes de destruction massive et les guerres. Nous estimons en effet qu'à moins d'une déflagration ou d'une catastrophe globale majeure, le système actuel de « maintien ou de rétablissement de la paix et de la sécurité internationales », qui repose sur le Conseil de sécurité, ne pourra être à moyen terme ni réformé, ni remplacé, ni contourné. Il convient d'ajouter qu'en dépit de ses nombreuses lacunes, il a réussi à éviter au cours des soixante-dix dernières années le déclenchement d'une Troisième Guerre mondiale.

Nous ne voyons pas non plus d'alternative à la Conférence du désarmement de l'ONU et aux instruments qu'elle a contribués à créer comme le Traité sur la non-prolifération des armes nucléaires. Même si les résultats des travaux de cette Conférence sont pour le moins mitigés, il est très improbable que les principaux décideurs en charge de ce sujet, à savoir les États, acceptent à moyen terme et à l'unanimité – condition sine qua non d'un désarmement généralisé et sûr pour toute la planète – de renoncer à leurs équipements militaires. Notre approche n'évite pas pour autant les questions de sécurité puisqu'une politique internationale de développement durable participe à la réduction des sources de tension, voire de conflit pour l'accès aux ressources économiques ou naturelles et agit donc de manière préventive.

2. Un partenariat mondial et huit plateformes sectorielles

La deuxième caractéristique de notre proposition est qu'elle s'appuie sur le partenariat mondial dont fait mention le Programme de développement durable à l'horizon 2030. Ce concept exclut la création de nouvelles institutions internationales, qu'il s'agisse d'une organisation spécialisée comme une hypothétique Organisation mondiale de l'environnement ou d'un super-gouvernement mondial qui chapeauterait, voire se substituerait à l'ONU et au trio OMC-FMI-Banque mondiale.

Deux raisons justifient notre choix. La première est qu'en l'absence d'un hegemoncapable d'imposer ce nouvel ordre à la planète et/ou d'une catastrophe sans précédent qui retirerait au système actuel toute légitimité aux yeux des États et des peuples, il est extrêmement peu probable que ces mêmes États acceptent de se dessaisir de leurs compétences au profit d'organisations internationales, qu'elles soient spécialisées ou générales. La politique de l'actuel président américain Donald Trump, franchement hostile au multilatéralisme, manifeste de l'abandon par Washington de son rôle de principal garant et promoteur d'un ordre international ouvert et structuré par des liens plus étroits et durables que d'éphémères deals bilatéraux.

La seconde raison, plus profonde, est que de notre point de vue, le modèle actuel d'organisation internationale reposant sur une coopération entre États membres est tombé en désuétude. Partout ailleurs, de la conduite d'opérations militaires à la réalisation de programmes de recherche scientifique, la logique de projet suggère que « c'est la mission qui détermine la coalition, et non l'inverse », comme l'avait expliqué le secrétaire américain à la Défense Donald Rumsfeld en 2001. Autrement dit, nous sommes passés à une ère de partenariats ad hoc qui n'ont pas vocation à être permanents et qui réunissent des acteurs volontaires et pertinents pour l'accomplissement d'un objectif précis pendant le temps nécessaire.

Cette évolution a été rendue possible pour partie grâce au progrès technique dans les domaines des transports et de la communication, qui facilitent les contacts entre des zones géographiquement très éloignées les unes des autres et qui permettent de coordonner virtuellement l'action d'un grand nombre de partenaires. Elle est aussi rendue indispensable par la fragmentation de plus en plus nette de la distribution du pouvoir et des connaissances entre des acteurs plus nombreux et plus variés – États, collectivités locales, entreprises, ONG mais aussi individus qui, via les plateformes participatives de crowd, produisent de l'information, lèvent des fonds et développent des innovations (Linux, SpaceShipOne, HeroX).

Il est significatif que la conquête spatiale, longtemps apanage d'un club restreint d'États en raison de ses coûts exorbitants et de son caractère non rentable, soit désormais ouverte à des entreprises privées, voire à des groupes d'étudiants. De la même façon, dans le domaine de l'aide au développement, la fondation de droit privé Bill & Melinda Gates, avec plus de 1 000 collaborateurs et 4 milliards de dollars de subventions déboursés chaque année, a un impact sans doute plus important sur la population de la planète que de nombreuses agences étatiques, voire que certains États eux-mêmes.

La logique partenariale que nous appelons de nos vœux n'est pas inédite en matière de politique internationale. Si le partenariat mondial évoqué dans le Programme de développement durable à l'horizon 2030 n'est pas encore opérationnel, il existe déjà par exemple un Partenariat global pour l'éducation (GPE), une Alliance du vaccin (GAVI) ou encore un Fonds mondial de lutte contre le sida, la tuberculose et le paludisme. De l'avis de Pascal Lamy, ancien directeur général de l'OMC, dans ce dernier dossier, « l’Organisation mondiale de la santé, franchement, n’a eu aucune efficacité, la preuve étant qu’il a fallu créer le Fonds mondial de lutte contre le sida qui, lui, fonctionne bien. L’OMS correspond à une gouvernance westphalienne, version Conseil de sécurité, alors que le Fonds mondial de lutte contre le sida, c’est de la “polygouvernance” » [7].

Ces initiatives ont en commun d'avoir des buts concrets et d'être ouvertes à des acteurs non-étatiques. Lancées au début des années 2000, elles peuvent aussi se targuer d'avoir obtenu de très bons résultats. C'est pourquoi nous suggérons d'appliquer ce modèle dans les domaines qui ne sont pas encore couverts par de tels programmes et de mettre sur pied, sous l'égide du partenariat mondial des Nations Unies, huit plateformes sectorielles correspondant à toutes les dimensions d'une politique internationale de développement durable : bâtiment et logement, WASH (eau, assainissement, hygiène), énergie, mobilité, télécommunications, santé, éducation et missions régaliennes (administration, fiscalité, sécurité et justice). Elles pourraient bien sûr s'appuyer sur des structures déjà existantes.

Chacune de ces plateformes serait ouverte aux acteurs disposant d’une réelle expertise dans le secteur considéré, indépendamment de leur nature (collectivités locales, entreprises et consultants indépendants, ONG et fondations, agences nationales de développement…) et de leur localisation. Les acteurs seraient incités à rejoindre les plateformes en grappes, c’est-à-dire avec des partenaires avec lesquels ils ont déjà travaillé, qu’ils soient donateurs, exécutants ou bénéficiaires. Les grappes doivent valoriser l’expérience et les relations de confiance construites autour de projets précédents afin de favoriser leur réplicabilité et d’améliorer leurs performances, que ce soit en termes de coûts ou de vitesse d’exécution.

Le caractère ouvert des plateformes leur permettrait de recevoir la contribution d'acteurs désireux de participer à la politique internationale de développement durable en dépit de l'opposition de leur État hôte. On pense évidemment aux États-Unis, qui pourraient se délier de l'Accord de Paris sur le climat en tant qu'État, mais dont plus de 200 villes, neuf États fédérés et un millier d'entreprises représentant au total un tiers de la population et du PIB américains continueront d'appliquer l'Accord [9].

3. Des objectifs clairs et des indicateurs de suivi fiables

Les plateformes sectorielles doivent servir d'outils de communication, de mobilisation et de coordination en premier lieu pour leurs membres, mais elles doivent aussi communiquer et mobiliser à l'extérieur afin d'afficher leur efficacité et de convaincre toujours plus d'acteurs de les rejoindre. C'est pourquoi elles devront tout d'abord définir des buts qui déclinent dans leurs secteurs respectifs et en termes techniques les 17 objectifs et les 169 cibles de l'Agenda 2030 des Nations Unies.

Tout projet, en tant base d'action, devra s'inscrire sous un ou plusieurs de ces buts et démontrer sa capacité à faire progresser les indicateurs correspondants,ex antesous forme d'estimation puisex postsous forme d'évaluation. À l'heure d'Internet, du crowdsourcinget du big data, il est grand temps, également dans le domaine de la statistique, de prendre acte de la fin du quasi monopole des États dans la collecte de ces données et d'abandonner le processsus linéaire action-mesure-rapport-compilation au profit d'un système automatisé qui permettrait à un grand nombre de participants de renseigner des informations et d'obtenir un retour presque en temps réel. Un exemple de cette révolution est la vitesse et le haut niveau d'exactitude des prévisions du service Google Flu Trends, qui parvenait à savoir avant les Centres publics américains pour le contrôle et la prévention des maladies (CDC) quand éclataient les épidémies de grippe [10].

La diffusion à large échelle de l'accès à Internet, de terminaux de connexion (ordinateurs, téléphones mobiles, tablettes), d'applications faciles d'usage, et bientôt, d'objets connectés – l'Internet des objets – renforce la capacité à identifier rapidement et de manière fine la nature et la localisation des problèmes – criminalité ou violence d'État, sources de pollution, congestion automobile… – et donc, de les classer par ordre de priorité pour concentrer les moyens d'intervention disponibles là où ils produiront l'impact le plus grand.

L'intégration des batteries d'indicateurs de suivi des politiques publiques et des instruments de gestion de projets doit aussi faciliter le benchmarking à l'échelle globale afin de repérer les solutions les plus efficaces et d'accélérer leur réplicabilité là où cela est à la fois possible et pertinent, au besoin en les adaptant et/ou en les améliorant.

La tentative de ramener dans un cadre commun les actions souvent dispersées des gouvernements nationaux et de leurs agences, des collectivités locales, des ONG ou encore des entreprises – pour ne citer que ceux-là – n’est finalement qu’une extension de la notion de « cohérence des politiques de développement » (CPD), étudiée de façon très poussée par l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques (OCDE) mais qui s’est jusqu’à maintenant surtout concentrée sur la cohérence entre politiques publiques (agriculture, commerce…).Les plateformes vont plus loin en visant à assurer la complémentarité des actions entre différents niveaux et types d’acteurs ainsi qu'à reconnaître aux organes non étatiques un rôle dans la définition comme dans la mise en œuvre de la politique internationale de développement durable.

4. Une logique de projet

On l'aura compris, si la logique du partenariat sectoriel, volontaire et ouvert, plutôt que la coopération interétatique dans des organisations internationales, est à la base de notre conception des liens entre acteurs de la politique internationale de développement durable, la brique opérationnelle de ce modèle est le projet. Que l'on parle de la construction d'une école, d'un programme de formation de juges ou du renouvellement d'une flotte d'autobus pour en diminuer les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, ces projets participent à la réalisation d'une politique internationale de développement durable et de réduction des risques globaux. Ils devraient donc être comptabilisés comme tels.

Comme énoncé plus haut, cela signifie que ces projets doivent être rattachés à un certain nombre d'indicateurs sectoriels et, indirectement, aux cibles et objectifs de l'Agenda 2030. Il n'en résulte pas pour autant que les projets doivent être mono-sectoriels. Au contraire, lorsque c'est pertinent, ils s'appuieraient sur plusieurs plateformes pour éviter les écueils des approches purement « SWAp » (Sector-Wide Approach) et encourager la recherche de synergies entre secteurs, par exemple via le déploiement de systèmes intelligents dans le bâtiment ou le transport ou la mutualisation des travaux de génie civil pour la mise en place d’infrastructures de réseau.

La logique de projet nous paraît également être le véhicule le mieux adapté à traduire sur le plan opérationnel l'approche intégrée mentionnée plus haut et à faire coopérer vers un ou plusieurs objectifs communs des acteurs de nature diverse (gouvernements, agences publiques, collectivités locales, entreprises privées, ONG…) et parfois très éloignés géographiquement.

La nouveauté que nous introduisons ici consiste à accompagner le partenariat mondial et les plateformes sectorielles d'un système informatique qui rassemblerait de manière intelligible, dynamique et interconnectée les projets déjà réalisés, ceux en cours de préparation – appels à projets et recherche de partenaires – et ceux en cours de réalisation. Cette grande base de données faciliterait la mise en relation d'acteurs et la promotion des meilleures pratiques à l'échelle globale.

5. Financement

Dernier point de notre modèle, la question du financement doit, selon nous, également refléter l'approche intégrée et la méthode évolutionniste retenues jusqu'à maintenant. La difficulté à doter le Fonds vert pour le climat d'un budget de 100 milliards de dollars par an – cible fixée en 2009 et ne représentant pourtant que moins de… 0,002% du PIB mondial de l'époque – montre que l'instrument classique de collecte de contributions volontaires de la part des États n'est plus à la hauteur des défis du XXIesiècle.

De la même façon, le fameux objectif de 0,7% du revenu national brut que les pays membres du Comité d’aide au développement (CAD) de l’OCDE se sont engagés dans les années 1970 à consacrer à l'aide publique au développement (APD) est devenue pour partie obsolète avant même d'avoir été atteint. « Cela ne signifie pas que la solidarité internationale ait diminué : au contraire, les fonds investis chaque année dans ce que l’on peut appeler “les politiques publiques internationales”augmentent. » [11] Cette tendance n'est cependant plus portée par les États, mais par des ONG et des entreprises dans le cadre de leurs politiques de responsabilité sociale et environnementale (RSE) – dépenses qui ne sont pas comptabilisées dans l'APD.

La logique de l'APD reflète également une division entre donateurs et bénéficiaires qui ne correspond plus à la réalité du XXIe siècle. La montée en puissance de pays émergents, qu'ils soient « grands » (Chine) ou moyens (Corée du Sud, Turquie), place certains États dans la double position de bénéficiaire et de donateur. En outre, comme l'aurait déclaré un diplomate français, « nous sommes tous des pays en voie de développement durable » face aux risques globaux.

La première source de financement d'une politique internationale ambitieuse de développement durable doit donc venir d'une comptabilisation plus précise et d'une meilleure coordination des moyens déjà engagés dans cette politique, mais qui échappent à la statistique. Il s'agit notamment des dépenses des ONG et des entreprises, auxquelles on pourrait ajouter les investissements réalisés dans les pays développés et contribuant à la préservation des biens communs, par exemple en faveur de la protection de la biodiversité et de la diminution des gaz à effet de serre. Ce doit être l'une des fonctions du système informatique évoqué dans la section précédente.

Il n'est pas exclu pour autant de chercher à lever des fonds supplémentaires. Nous voyons ici deux instruments susceptibles de générer des recettes importantes et réalistes dans leur mise en œuvre, sur les plans à la fois technique et politique.

Le premier est évidemment la tarification globale du carbone. Un tel mécanisme permettrait non seulement de lever de grandes sommes d'argent, mais encouragerait aussi entreprises et consommateurs à adopter des produits, services et processus qui émettent moins de gaz à effet de serre et concourent donc à limiter l'ampleur du changement climatique.

Ses modalités d'application reflètent d'ailleurs les principes de notre modèle. Tout d'abord, la tarification du carbone n'est pas l'apanage des États : certaines entreprises intègrent déjà un prix interne du carbone dans leurs calculs pour accélérer l'application de solutions d'économies d'énergie et de ressources naturelles.

De plus, il s'agit d'un mécanisme intégré, dans la mesure où les recettes générées peuvent être réinvesties dans des projets à objectifs multiples, combinant par exemple protection de l'environnement et lutte contre la pauvreté. Ce type de partage des gains peut convaincre un grand nombre d'États aujourd'hui relativement moins industrialisés à se rallier à la politique internationale de développement durable [12].

Enfin, l'unanimité des États de la planète n'est pas requise pour conférer à la tarification globale du carbone une masse critique – il est possible, dans le respect des règles actuelles du commerce international, de mettre sur pied un « club » des marchés du carbone déjà existants dans une quarantaine de pays. Les autres pays seraient incités à le rejoindre grâce à des mécanismes d'ajustement aux frontières [13].

Le deuxième instrument possible fait écho au rôle ascendant des entreprises dans nos sociétés et à leur désir encore souvent inassouvi d'exercer des responsabilités à la hauteur de leur impact global. Dans le cas des multinationales, il ne fait guère de doute qu'elles comptent parmi les principaux bénéficiaires de la mondialisation. L'intégration commerciale et financière de la planète est non seulement une condition de leur existence même, mais elle assure aussi un environnement favorable à leur croissance : fragmentation des chaînes de valeur grâce à la levée des obstacles aux échanges, économies d'échelle, recherche de ressources naturelles, de talents et d'autres avantages comparatifs sur l'ensemble du globe… au risque parfois de pratiquer le dumping social, fiscal et environnemental.

Pour que la mondialisation puisse survivre aux menaces globales comme aux courants populistes qui la remettent en cause dans un nombre croissant de pays , nous proposons que les multinationales s'acquittent d'un impôt ou d'une contribution volontaire qui financerait le fonctionnement du partenariat mondial des Nations Unies et des huit plateformes sectorielles précitées ainsi que la réalisation de projets formulés dans le cadre de ces plateformes.

En échange, ces entreprises deviendraient pleinement légitimes à participer à la conception et la mise en œuvre de la politique internationale de développement durable, alors que leur rôle dans ce domaine manque actuellement de transparence et de coordination. Si les entreprises sont déjà associées à des initiatives comme le Partenariat global pour l'éducation, nous avons vu en introduction qu'en dehors de l'OIT, elles ne sont pas formellement représentées dans les organisations internationales ou bien y sont réduites à une fonction consultative, comme lors des conférences climatiques COP.

Pourtant, en coulisses, elles ont déjà, via leurs pratiques de lobbying, une influence considérable sur les processus globaux de prise de décision, par exemple en matière commerciale. Plutôt que de chercher avec plus ou moins de réussite à faire obstacle à ce phénomène, nous estimons préférable de reconnaître le rôle politique des entreprises dans la mondialisation tout en les plaçant face à leurs responsabilités, y compris en termes financiers.

À elles seules, les trois sociétés informatiques Apple, Google et Microsoft sont assises sur plus de 450 milliards de dollars de liquidités ! Compte tenu des faibles taux d'intérêt actuels, plutôt que d'être investi dans des bons du Trésor à bas rendement, cet argent pourrait être employé pour répondre aux grands défis globaux. Les dirigeants de ce type d'entreprise, souvent jeunes, ambitieux et visionnaires, ne rechignent pas à faire de la politique et à concevoir leur mission au-delà du cadre strict de leur société. Mark Zuckerberg n'est-il pas pressenti comme un potentiel candidat à la présidentielle américaine ? Pourtant, au vu du poids de Facebook (plus de 2 milliards d'utilisateurs actifs et 35 milliards de dollars en trésorerie), c'est à se demander si c'est de la Maison Blanche ou de Menlo Park qu'il peut avoir le plus grand impact sur les affaires du monde. Proposons à ces personnalités de prendre leur part là où ils seront les plus utiles.

3. Motivation

1. Core Values

The objectives and targets of our model are the same as those of the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This “positive” agenda is a response to four global risks – climate change, environmental damage, conflict and extreme poverty – and although this agenda is not legally binding for states or international organizations in the UN system, it is based on political legitimacy and the greatest possible consensus.

The functioning of the partnership is based, for its part, on the principles of openness and voluntary participation. In our model, democratic legitimacy is derived from the recognition of the equal worth of every human being and this is ensured at the level of our objectives (see above). The choice of instruments and means, however, is left to the bodies with the technical and financial capacity for implementation.

At the same time, democratic legitimacy is reasserting itself at the micro level, in the preparation and implementation of projects via consultation mechanisms and citizen participation.

2. Decision-making Capacity

The objectives and targets of our model have already been defined by the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda. The principles of openness and voluntary participation that characterize the global partnership and the sectoral platforms removes obstacles to decision making since actors only participate in those platforms and projects that they want to be involved in.

Our model even makes it possible to circumvent certain vetoes and existing blocks. For example, the government of the United States is not supporting the implementation of the Paris Agreement or the financing of international organizations. Our model enables substate bodies like local authorities or businesses to contribute to the formulation and implementation of an international sustainable development agenda.

3. Effectiveness

Thanks to its global dimension and open character, both in geographical terms and in terms of the participants, our model facilitates access to excellent existing solutions, thus responding to macro challenges and risks via micro projects. Its open and voluntary character reduces the need to rely on a “global police force” to ensure the execution of decisions. The careful monitoring of results and the impact of projects as well as the transparency of the IT system that records these enables citizens and the media to exert pressure so that decisions are actually executed and are cost-effective.

4. Resources and Financing

From a technical perspective, the global partnership can be administered by an existing international organization like the United Nations, which would provide the secretariat and maintain the IT system. Any additional administration costs arising from this model are minimal since the essential data and other resources already exist and often only need to be better coordinated.

However, an international sustainable development agenda will attain its objectives even more quickly if it has access to significant funds. We propose raising new revenue via a global carbon tax and/or a voluntary contribution or a global tax imposed on multinationals who, in exchange, have the right to fully participate in a transparent way in the design and implementation of an international sustainable development agenda.

Multinationals are indeed some of the main beneficiaries of globalization today and are increasingly threatened by both global risks and the development of populist movements in a growing number of countries. Thus, they have an interest in taking responsibility with regard to the planet in order to protect what they have gained from globalization.

5. Trust and Insight

The functioning and activity of global partnership, sectoral platforms and projects are completely transparent and accessible thanks to the open IT system.

Global partnership enjoys the greatest possible policy legitimacy at international level since its principles have already been approved by the United Nations.

At an operational level, the sectoral platforms utilize intermediaries only for setting up relationships and monitoring. Consequently, the trust that the model enjoys depends on the trust enjoyed by the participants themselves. From this point of view, the involvement of NGOs is crucial to ensure citizen monitoring of the functioning of the model, while also bestowing a note of confidence.

6. Flexibility

The model is based on the principles of agreement and voluntary participation: in consequence, it is completely flexible. Its implementation does not require states to be unanimous; project implementation, for its part, depends on the commitment of the partners. The main concept of the model is that “the mission should determine the coalition, and not the other way around”. The number of participants is virtually unlimited.

7. Protection against the Abuse of Power

The main system of monitoring follows from the transparency of the model, which provides all citizens and the media with the opportunity to monitor its functioning and to report any potential problems. Furthermore, the model does not call into question the principle of the sovereignty of states. In consequence, these retain the power to block, in the sense of their internal constitutional rules, the participation of substate actors in global partnership or even project implementation in their territory.

8. Accountability

The open nature, the transparency and voluntary participation in the system ensure that the partners are responsible for the success of the projects and that results are known to all, giving citizens and the media the opportunity to exert pressure and thus encourage the actors in question to commit themselves to projects and to respect these commitments.

1. Valeurs fondamentales

Les objectifs et les cibles de notre modèle sont ceux du « Programme de développement durable à l'horizon 2030 » des Nations Unies. Cet agenda « positif » répond aux quatre risques globaux – le changement climatique, les dommages environnementaux, les conflits et l’extrême pauvreté – et bien qu'il ne soit juridiquement contraignant ni pour les États, ni pour les autres organisations internationales du système des Nations Unies, il repose sur la légitimité politique et le consensus les plus larges possibles.

Le fonctionnement du partenariat repose quant à lui sur les principes d'ouverture et de participation volontaire. Dans notre modèle, la légitimité démocratique qui dérive de la reconnaissance de la valeur égale de tous les êtres humains est assurée au niveau des objectifs (voir ci-dessus), tandis que le choix des instruments et des moyens est laissé aux entités qui disposent des capacités techniques et financières de mise en œuvre.

Néanmoins, à l'échelle micro, la légitimité démocratique trouve de nouveau à s'exprimer dans la préparation et la réalisation des projets à travers les mécanismes de consultation et de participation citoyenne.

2. Capacité de décision

Les objectifs et les cibles de notre modèle sont déjà définis par l'Agenda 2030 des Nations Unies. Les principes d'ouverture et de participation volontaire caractéristiques du partenariat mondial et des plateformes sectorielles lèvent les obstacles à la prise de décision puisque ne prennent part aux plateformes et aux projets que les acteurs désireux de le faire.

Notre modèle permet même de contourner certains vetos et blocages existants, par exemple celui du gouvernement des États-Unis dans l'application de l'Accord de Paris sur le climat ou le financement d'organisations internationales, puisqu'il donne la possibilité aux entités infraétatiques telles que les collectivités territoriales ou les entreprises de contribuer malgré tout à l'élaboration et la mise en œuvre de la politique internationale de développement durable.

3. Efficacité

Par sa dimension globale et son caractère ouvert, tant en termes géographiques que de nature des participants, notre modèle facilite l'accès aux meilleures solutions existantes pour répondre par des projets micro aux défis et risques macro. Son caractère ouvert et volontaire réduit la nécessité de s'appuyer sur un « gendarme mondial » pour assurer l'exécution des décisions, tandis que le suivi fin des résultats et de l'impact des projets ainsi que la transparence du système informatique qui les enregistre confèrent aux citoyens et aux media un moyen de pression pour exiger non seulement l'exécution des décisions, mais aussi de l'efficience d'un point de vue coûts-bénéfices.

4. Ressources et financement

Sur le plan technique, le partenariat peut être géré par une organisation internationale existante comme les Nations Unies, qui en assurerait le secrétariat ainsi que la maintenance du système informatique. Les coûts de gestion supplémentaires découlant du modèle sont minimes puisque l'essentiel des données et des autres ressources existent déjà et doivent seulement être mieux coordonnées.

En revanche, la politique internationale de développement durable atteindra d'autant plus rapidement ses objectifs qu'elle disposera de moyens importants. Nous proposons de lever de nouvelles recettes au travers d'une tarification globale du carbone et/ou d'une contribution volontaire ou d'un impôt global versé par les multinationales en échange du droit de participer pleinement et de manière transparente à la conception et la mise en œuvre de la politique internationale de développement durable.

Les multinationales comptent en effet parmi les principaux bénéficiaires de la mondialisation aujourd'hui de plus en plus menacée par les risques globaux et l'essor des courants populistes dans un nombre croissant de pays. Elles ont donc intérêt à prendre leurs responsabilités vis-à-vis de la planète pour protéger les acquis de ce processus.

5. Confiance et transparence

Le fonctionnement et l'activité du partenariat mondial, des plateformes sectorielles et des projets sont complètement transparents et accessibles à tous grâce au système informatique ouvert.

Le partenariat mondial s'appuie sur la légitimité politique la plus forte possible au niveau international puisque son principe a déjà été approuvé par les Nations Unies.

Sur le plan opérationnel, les plateformes sectorielles ne servent que d'intermédiaires pour la mise en relation et le suivi, par conséquent la confiance dont jouira le modèle est fonction de celle dont bénéficient les participants. L'adhésion des ONG est de ce point de vue cruciale pour exercer un contrôle citoyen et un rôle critique sur le fonctionnement du modèle, tout en lui conférant une caution de confiance.

6. Flexibilité

Le modèle repose sur les principes d'adhésion et de participation volontaire, en conséquence il est totalement flexible. Sa mise en place ne requiert pas l'unanimité des États, tandis que la réalisation des projets dépend de l'engagement des partenaires. L'idée force du modèle est que « c'est la mission qui détermine la coalition, et non l'inverse ». Le nombre de participants est virtuellement illimité.

7. Protection contre l’abus de pouvoir

Le principal système de contrôle découle de la transparence du modèle, qui offre à tous les citoyens comme aux media la possibilité de suivre son fonctionnement et de dénoncer d'éventuels problèmes. En outre, le modèle ne remet pas en cause le principe de souveraineté des États, par conséquent ceux-ci conservent le pouvoir de bloquer, dans le respect de leurs règles constitutionnelles internes, la participation d'acteurs infraétatiques au partenariat mondial ou bien la réalisation de projets sur leur territoire.

8. Responsabilité

Les caractères d'ouverture, de transparence et de participation volontaire du système assurent que les partenaires sont responsables de la réussite des projets et leurs résultats sont connus de tous, donnant aux citoyens et aux media des moyens de pression pour inciter les acteurs concernés à prendre des engagements et à les respecter.

References

  • Norman Angell, La Grande Illusion, Paris, Hachette, 2010.
  • Suzannne Berger, Notre première mondialisation. Leçons d'un échec oublié, Paris, Le Seuil, 2003.
  • Charte des Nations-Unies du 26 juin 1945.
  • John Maynard Keynes, Les Conséquences économiques de la paix, Paris, Gallimard, 2002.
  • Montesquieu, De l’Esprit des lois, Paris, Gallimard, 1995.
  • Assemblée générale des Nations Unies, Résolution A/RES/70/1, 21 octobre 2015.
  • « Le monde au risque de la désintégration », Esprit, 2017/6 (Juin), pp. 86-97. DOI : 10.3917/espri.1706.0086.
  • David Menascé, La contribution des entreprises multinationales aux Objectifs du millénaire pour le développement, Observatoire du BOP, 2012.
  • « We are still in », https://www.wearestillin.com.
  • David Lazer, Ryan Kennedy, Gary King, Alessandro Vespignani, « The Parable of Google Flu: Traps in Big Data Analysis », Science, 2014, 343(6176), pp. 1203-1205. DOI : 10.1126/science.1248506.
  • Jean-Michel Severino et Olivier Ray, « La fin de l’aide publique au développement : mort et renaissance d’une politique publique globale », Revue d’économie du développement, 2011/1 (Vol. 19), pp. 5-44. DOI :10.3917/edd.251.0005.
  • Commission de haut niveau sur les prix du carbone, Report of the High-Level Commission on Carbon Prices, Washington, Banque mondiale, 2017.
  • William Nordhaus, « Climate Clubs: Overcoming Free-Riding in International Climate Policy », American Economic Review, 2015, 105(4), pp. 1339-70. DOI : 10.1257/aer.15000001.